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VOLUME 1 , ISSUE 1 ( January-April, 2023 ) > List of Articles

CASE REPORT

Delayed Neurotoxic Paralysis with Confounding Hypokalaemia

Utsav Anand Mani, Pranay Gupta

Keywords : Case report, Hypokalaemia, Neurotoxic, Snake envenomation

Citation Information : Mani UA, Gupta P. Delayed Neurotoxic Paralysis with Confounding Hypokalaemia. 2023; 1 (1):26-28.

DOI: 10.5005/njem-11015-0002

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 16-08-2023

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2023; The Author(s).


Abstract

Snakebite is a major health issue in India and developing nations across the globe. Common krait bites are associated with delayed paralysis and locked-in syndrome. Locked-in syndrome has been documented among patients of snakebite. Our case is unique due to the confounding effect of hypokalaemia which may confuse the physician as hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HPP), a rare genetic condition which can also be precipitated by a stressful event such as snakebite. To the best of our knowledge, we could not associate the presence of hypokalaemia in patients of neurotoxic snakebite. As krait bite are often not associated with the history of having witnessed, a snake due to its nocturnal habit and painless bite, such hypokalaemia should not lead the physician to misdiagnose this snakebite as severe HPP. We urge our fellow researchers to look out for similar findings in their patients. Key messages: Locked-in syndrome in snakebites can be due to the effect of the venom in blood onto the ventral pons. To the best of our knowledge, we could not associate the presence of hypokalaemia in patients of neurotoxic snakebite. We presume this hypokalaemia to be nutritional in origin. As krait bites are often not associated with the history of having witnessed, a snake due to its nocturnal habit and painless bite, such hypokalaemia should not lead the physician to misdiagnose this snakebite as severe HPP.


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